Teresita Fernández

From 30 May 2001 to 26 June 2001

For her first solo exhibition in a European museum, Teresita Fernández is uncovering the notion of landscape as the site of the encounter between wilderness and human presence. Drawing from her investigations into garden architecture, the artist has revived an idea of nature organized according to a hierarchy, offering the viewer a series of experiences that change according to the rhythm of the steps through the defined space of the garden. According to this important concept, which unites the eyes of the observer and the body in motion, Fernández has reconfigured the museum spaces to involve the visitors in a physical and mental passage. Shaped by deliberate artifice and rich in pictorial allusion, Fernández’s garden welcomes us with the potent image of a waterfall. Waterfall (Cascata), 2000, is an illusion at the edge of two-dimensionality, but it is able to define an interior, penetrable space that is physically and sensually suggestive. The work 3:37 pm, 2001, without actually representing a rainbow, evokes its rare manifestation, tying it to a precise moment in time. Walking parallel to the wall on which the work is installed, the movement of our body re-composes before our eyes the spectrum, in all likelihood bringing to mind the sensations linked to the appearance of this natural phenomenon. In the second room of the exhibition Fernández has built a secluded environment that sustains one’s attention with studied slowness. On the walls are two sculptural elements entitled Wisteria (Glicine), 2000-01. Inspired by the abstract structure of flowering wisteria, each of the two installations takes shape from the interaction with the supporting wall, animating it with an unexpected geometry. The vibration of color, yellow and green respectively, that fills the space between the sculpture and the wall, urges our eyes to carry out a subtle perceptual maneuver and our bodies to follow suit, pausing for a moment. Pond (Stagno), 2001, conveys a predilection for the expanses of water that, over the centuries, have defined the esthetic of so many gardens. As if to invite us to seek our potentially reflected image, the work, instead, seems to hold our memories, capturing them amid the organic forms that animate its surface. Marcella Beccaria

From 30 May 2001 to 26 June 2001